How to Write a Professional Services Proposal

by Flora Richards-Gustafson; Updated September 26, 2017

When you are negotiating a professional business transaction, it is a good idea to put the details of the proposal in writing. A professional services proposal should include the benefits of the services you are offering a prospective client, the cost of those services and any additional terms you feel are necessary to include, such as kill fees. An individual may ask you for a proposal when she is shopping for bids on a large project or for bids on a task she does not want to perform herself.

Step 1

Create an executive summary. An executive summary provides a prospective client with information regarding your business and the professional services you offer. When you write about your services, detail the benefits that may best fit your prospective client’s needs.

Step 2

Note your mission statement. The mission statement lets the individual know your role in your particular professional service industry. Let the prospective client know how you plan to meet his requirements and exceed his expectations.

Step 3

Write about the professional services you offer. This is where you tell the prospect exactly what your services entail. Explain how your services stand out from your competition. Detail how you manage professional projects, project completion timelines and the cost for the services offered.

Step 4

Include a market analysis in your professional services proposal. Tell your prospective client about your competition, the services they offer, as well as your plans to offer better services, results or service prices. Use hard data to support your claim.

Tips

  • Write in a manner easy for the reader to understand. Do not use jargon. Include visual elements only if appropriate.

About the Author

Flora Richards-Gustafson has been writing professionally since 2003. She creates copy for websites, marketing materials and printed publications. Richards-Gustafson specializes in SEO and writing about small-business strategies, health and beauty, interior design, emergency preparedness and education. Richards-Gustafson received a Bachelor of Arts from George Fox University in 2003 and was recognized by Cambridge's "Who's Who" in 2009 as a leading woman entrepreneur.