How to Do a Project Scope Review

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A project scope document is essential to clarify a project’s deliverables, whether the project is developing software or landscaping a yard. The project scope document is often created by a project manager or an analyst, working closely with the customer and other project team members. Once the scope is complete, it should be reviewed with the customer, team and management to verify that it is accurate, all interested parties agree to it and the results of the project will meet the customers’ needs. The scope should be approved by the customer and members of your organization according to your development process.

Prepare for the Project Scope Review

Create a list of all customers and team members who need to review the scope document. Review project initiation documents or consult with the project manager to gather this information.

Set up a meeting and invite all team members. The meeting may be in person or it may be virtual, depending on your organization’s structure and technology.

Send the completed scope document to the list. Send it several days before the meeting to give attendees sufficient time to review it.

Make copies of the document to bring to a physical meeting. Even if you plan to display an electronic copy on an overhead projector or similar device, some of your attendees may be more comfortable working from a hard copy.

Conduct Scope Review with Customers and Team Members

Meet with the customers and the team. Read through the document, particularly those areas that are more complex or more subject to interpretation. Although you have sent the document out ahead of time, expect that most attendees have not written it.

Capture any outstanding questions or changes to the document scope.

Update the scope with the answers to questions and other changes, and send it to the customers and project team members, requesting sign off and approval of the document.

Tips

  • In some organizations, you may find it difficult to schedule meetings that everyone can attend. Find out the people who absolutely must attend in person, and schedule around their calendars. Follow up with others who can’t attend either through email or phone calls to see if they have any comments on the scope document.

References

About the Author

Page Coleman began writing in 2009 and has been published by the Twin Cities Daily Planet, an award-winning citizen journalist news website. Despite a business analysis background, Coleman has focused on holistic health in her writing career. She holds a Bachelor of Science in business management, an integrative health and healing certificate and a Level-1 Acupressure Certificate.

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