How to Update Customer Information

by Hunter Taylor; Updated September 26, 2017
Double-check customer information when updating records.

A business continues to exist because of its customers. To continue to sell to its customers, the business must ensure that the customers' records are maintained and updated. The basic information that should be updated includes the customer's name, address, contact phone number, fax number and email address. Customer information can be updated via a form, online or by phone.

Step 1

Review the customer invoice. Often there are is an option for the customer to write in the new account information. If the customer has written new information on the invoice, go into the computer system and update the information accordingly. Double-check to ensure that the new information has been entered accurately. Contact the customer to advise him that his account has been updated.

Step 2

Ask the customer to verify her account information. During a customer phone call, ask the customer, "May I have your current address, phone number and email address?" Some companies, such as mortgage companies, ask the customer to verify the address to ensure that the company has the correct record. Repeat the information back to the customer to verify that it was entered accurately.

Step 3

Allow the computer systems to update the customer information. Companies that have websites provide an option for customers to update their own account information online. The updated information is transmitted through the computer system automatically. Be sure to send the customer a record of this transaction via email or regular mail. This will remind the customer that changes were made to the account.

Tips

  • If customer information updates are not offered during regular intervals, contact the customers specifically for account updates.

Warnings

  • Distinguish between mailing and shipping addresses. Larger companies often order a product or service for different locations—verify where an item will be shipped versus where the invoice will be sent.

About the Author

Hunter Taylor has been a freelance writer since 2005. She has authored articles for the "The Social Contract Journal," as well as newspapers, legislative magazines and e-newsletters for state legislators and organizations. Taylor holds a Master of Business Administration from Shorter University.

Photo Credits

  • Don Farrall/Photodisc/Getty Images