How to Start a Cleaning Business of Your Own Cheaply

by Valencia Higuera; Updated September 26, 2017

Starting a business generally requires capital or start-up money. You can use these funds to advertise the business and buy supplies. But unfortunately, not everyone has access to start-up capital. If starting a cleaning business, you can operate the business with little cash. You won't have money to spend on expensive advertising campaigns, but by hitting the pavement, you can secure work and begin building your business.

Determine your niche. Your cleaning company can provide one type of service or multiple services. For example, you can specialize in office cleaning, residential cleaning, foreclosure clean-up, move-outs/move-ins or post construction clean-ups.

Write a cleaning contract for your service. Create a cleaning contract to present to business owners, residents and other clients. Customize each contract for the particular job (i.e., price and frequency). Include detailed information on your services, methods of cleaning, frequency of cleanings, contract length and payments due.

Market your cleaning business. Advertising or marketing a business is challenging without a lot of start-up capital. Employ inexpensive techniques such as going business-to-business and leaving your flyer and business cards with owners or office managers. Leave flyers on homes to market your residential cleaning business, or contact real estate agents, construction companies or banks and advertise your services.

Use your own products. Until your cleaning business starts to generate income, save money and use your own household products (cleaners, vacuum, mops, cloths) for cleaning jobs; or make your own non-toxic cleaning products to help minimize supply costs.

Tips

  • Visit your city's government offices and obtain a business license from the Commissioner of Revenue's office. Pay the required fee (varies for each state) and register your business name with the city.

    Before starting your cleaning business, contact a local insurance agent to discuss purchasing insurance for your business. Insurance covers damaged caused by you or your staff while cleaning the facility.

About the Author

Valencia Higuera is a freelance writer from Chesapeake, Virginia. She has contributed content to print publications and online publications such as Sidestep.com, AOL Travel, Work.com and ABC Loan Guide. Higuera primarily works as a personal finance, travel and medical writer. She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in English/journalism from Old Dominion University.

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