How to Refill a Stamp-Ever

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As a small-business leader, saving time and money is key to the success of your business. Self-inking stamps, such as the Stamp-Ever stamp, can be a helpful tool to have on hand. They come filled with enough ink for thousands of impressions, and it's easy to refill them when they start to run dry. Whether you want a custom Stamp-Ever stamp with your address, a signature line or other company information, you can stamp with less mess, more speed and for years to come.

When to Refill a Stamp-Ever Stamp

Your self-inking Stamp-Ever stamp uses just the right amount of ink for each impression. When it first arrives, the ink is dark on the page, and it stays this way for a long time. As the ink begins to run out, the stamp impressions are not quite as heavily pigmented as they once were. You might also find that you need to apply more pressure than usual when you stamp. If you notice these signs, it is probably time to refill the ink in the Stamp-Ever stamp.

Choosing Proper Ink Refills

Stamp ink refill bottles are widely available in office supply stores or online, but not all ink is created equal, and some can even gunk up or eat away at your stamp. The safest bet is to stick with a Stamp-Ever brand refill and to purchase the same color that is already in your stamp. If you want to use a different ink color, order another stamp rather than muddy up the ink colors in your existing unit by mixing them.

The Stamp-Ever company formulates this ink specifically to work with your stamp and keep it in good shape for years to come. As long as you don't venture off into trying other brands or types of ink, you can feel confident that your stamp will work efficiently and with clear detail. One way to ensure you always have the right ink on hand is to purchase one or two bottles when you order your next stamp.

Refilling Your Stamp-Ever Stamp

The Stamp-Ever company has made it simple to re-ink your stamp with a tiny bit of ink and just a little bit of planning. The ink needs to soak in overnight. If you refill the stamp at the end of the business day, you can use the stamp in the morning without waiting. To refill the stamp:

  1. Apply a few drops to the text of the Stamp-Ever stamp, but don't go crazy by adding too much ink. You don't need to open the unit to re-ink it.

  2. Set the Stamp-Ever stamp upside down overnight. If you saved the re-inking fluid box, it is sized perfectly to hold the Stamp-Ever stamp upside down.

  3. Blot the stamp the next morning by stamping it on scrap paper or using a tissue.

After you complete these steps, your Stamp-Ever stamp should make impressions just like it did when it was new. If you want to keep it this way, create a reminder to refill it at regular intervals so that you don't wait until it's hard to get a good impression before you add ink.

Cleaning Up Ink Spills

One advantage of using a self-inking stamp is that you don't have to fuss with messy stamp pads every day. However, you might spill some of the re-inking fluid during refills. Stamp ink can stain and seem impossible to get out unless you know the rubbing alcohol trick. If you spill ink on your desk, a bit of rubbing alcohol on a cotton pad removes it easily. Should you get ink on your clothes, try gently dabbing from both sides of the fabric with rubbing alcohol until you don't see the ink stain anymore.

References

About the Author

Anne Kinsey is an entrepreneur and business pioneer, who has ranked in the top 1% of the direct sales industry, growing a large team and earning the title of Senior Team Manager during her time with Jamberry. She is the nonprofit founder and executive director of Love Powered Life, as well as a Certified Trauma Recovery Coach, certified HRV biofeedback practitioner and freelance writer who has written for publications like Working Mother, the San Francisco Chronicle, the Houston Chronicle and Our Everyday Life. Anne works from her home office in rural North Carolina, where she resides with her husband and three children.

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