How to Reink an Ideal 200 Ink Stamper

by Christina Martinez; Updated September 26, 2017
You can reink this type of stamp, or replace the pad.

Self-inking stamps are an efficient way to stamp addresses, dates, signatures or other frequently used text or images. These types of stamps have a built-in ink pad. The ink pad is upside down, and the stamp die rests against it. Every time you use the stamp, the stamp die flips down and prints an image or text on the paper. When the ink pad runs dry, you can either refill it, or replace it entirely.

Items you will need

  • Ideal 200 Ink Stamper
  • Refill Ink
  • Paper
Step 1

Purchase ink refills. These are available at most office supply stores, or online. You may have to special-order ink refills if you go to an office supply store. For optimal performance, purchase Ideal stamp ink. Be sure to buy ink that matches the color of your ink pad.

Step 2

Push down the lock, which is the red button on the side of the stamp. This will help the stamp stay in place while you reink it.

Step 3

Pull the inkwell out until you hear a clicking sound. The inkwell is the black, curved part of the stamp. Once it's out, you'll see two circular refilling holes on the top of the inkwell.

Step 4

Fill each hole with 10 drops from the refill ink. Don't put more than 10 drops into each hole, as this may cause overflow and bleeding of the ink.

Step 5

Wait 15 minutes, and then unlock the stamp by pulling up on the lock button.

Step 6

Try out the stamp a few times on a sheet of paper. If the ink pad is still dry, repeat the process until you get the results you want. To avoid overflow, you should only put a few drops into each hole on the second attempt.

Warnings

  • This ink may stain, so wear protective clothing.

About the Author

Christina Martinez has been writing professionally since 2007. She's been published in the California State University at Fullerton newspaper, "The Daily Titan." Her writing has also appeared in "Orange County's Best" magazine. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in communications and print journalism from California State University.

Photo Credits

  • rubber stamp image by Christopher Hall from Fotolia.com