How to Ship Kombucha

post office, ottawa, canada image by Richard McGuirk from Fotolia.com

Kombucha is a beverage made by fermenting water, tea and sugar. Also called kombucha kvass, the drink has been consumed for centuries in Asia and Eastern Europe. In recent years, it has gained popularity in the U.S., due to its reputed health benefits. Many devotees have taken to brewing their own craft kombucha. If you have excess kombucha that you would like to ship to friends, family or customers, you need to take good care when packing them to make sure the bottles get there unharmed.

Pour kombucha into glass bottles or jars. Do not use plastic containers, since plastic can leach chemicals into the drink and may have hidden bacteria that can disrupt your culture.

Seal your containers tightly with screw-top lids. Flip top lids are not recommended because they can leak in transit.

Choose a cardboard box big enough to hold your bottles and a thick layer of packaging material.

Roll each individual bottle of kombucha tightly in bubble wrap or foam. Cover the tops and bottoms as well as the sides.

Place the bottles in your cardboard box. If there are gaps between the bottles, roll additional packaging material around the bottles.

Close the box and gently move it from side to side to make sure there is no shifting. If you hear the bottles shift, add more packaging material and repeat this step.

Seal the seams of your cardboard box with packing tape.

Write the address and return address on the outside of the box, and mark the word “FRAGILE” clearly on all sides.

Bring your package to the nearest post office, FedEx or UPS store to ship it. You will need to pay a shipping fee based on the package’s weight.

Tips

  • Advise your recipient to use caution when opening the kombucha bottles--like soda, the kombucha may fizz up when opened.

References

About the Author

Christina Sloane has been writing since 1992. Her work has appeared in several national literary magazines.

Photo Credits

  • post office, ottawa, canada image by Richard McGuirk from Fotolia.com