How to Collate

by Pepper Near; Updated September 26, 2017
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Collating is arranging a number of pages in a specific order, such as in books or reports. Collating can often be done automatically by copier machines, usually by pressing the "collate" button or choosing "collate" from the digital menu. However, it is sometimes necessary to collate a project by hand. Collating projects can be high volume, that is, a large number of finished products, or limited to several copies of a project. By following a consistent sequence, you can make both large and small collating projects become fairly simple and reliable tasks.

Items you will need

  • Pages to be collated
  • Table or counter space
Step 1

Lay out your stacks of pages face up on the counter or table space. Be sure to lay the pages out in reverse order; that is, the last page should be the first stack in your row.

Step 2

Pick up one page from each stack moving along the row, placing the new page on top of the ones already in your hand. Remember, the last page of the project should be the first page in your hand, and the first page of the project should be added to the pile in your hand last.

Step 3

When you have put the final page in your hand (which will be page one) place the collated pile at the end of your row of stacks, far enough away that the pages don't mix together with the last stack.

Step 4

Place the next completed pile on top of the first pile in the opposite direction. That is, one should lay vertically and one horizontally.

Step 5

Place each subsequent pile of collated projects either vertically or horizontally, whichever is opposite of the previous pile. Repeat these steps until your collating project is complete.

Tips

  • Keeping your stacks neat will make collating smoother.

About the Author

Pepper Near has written articles on such topics on such topics as growth and development in human beings and HIV/AIDS. Her expertise includes at-risk and teen parenting, childhood risk and resilience, and poverty issues. She holds a Master of Science in human development and family studies from Central Michigan University.