Instructions for the Brandt Coin Counter

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Brandt coin counters are manufactured for heavy-duty commercial use. The machines can verify coin authenticity, separate by denomination and pass 2,000 coins every minute. The machines are commonly used by banks and large retail stores that have a large amount of change passing through each day. The machines can also be used in the home by coin collectors, and they are portable enough for a single person to transport. The counter keeps an overall tally on the coins, and several different settings are available for rolling and bagging coins.

Plug the machine into a power source and turn the power switch to the "On" position. Place a coin bag under each of the two chutes and select an operating setting using the two dials.

Select the settings based on denomination and either a continuous count or a stopping point count. The continuous mode will continue counting and separating the selected denomination until you decide to stop. The stopping point will shut down the count and separating process when a predetermined number is reached. Use the stopping point for wrapping coins in paper.

Pour the coins into the coin feeder tray. Pour gradually to prevent overloading the machine. Feeding too many coins at one time can cause the machine to jam.

Use your hand to help feed the coins from the tray to the counter. Many of the coins will feed automatically, but sometimes a small push is necessary to keep things running at a fast pace.

Record the counts from the screen when all of the coins have been processed. Turn off the machine and remove the two bags from the chutes. One bag will be filled with one denomination of counted coins, and the other bag with uncounted coins. Select a new denomination on the machine to continue counting.

Tips

  • Begin by counting the largest denominations, then work down to smallest. Also, label all of the bags to maintain an organized environment and prevent the need for a recount.

Warnings

  • Keep the counter on a flat surface and ensure that the coin bags do not fall off the surface. Check the coin bags periodically to prevent overloading.

References

Resources

About the Author

Zach Lazzari is a Montana based freelance outdoor writer and photographer. You can follow his work at bustedoarlock.com.

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