How to Donate Office Supplies

by Kathy Adams

Many non-profit organizations accept office supplies, as do some schools and day camps for children. Before sending your donation of office supplies to your favorite organization, call first to ensure they accept items you wish to give. Select organizations in your local area whenever possible to avoid shipping costs and to benefit your own community.

Acceptable Supplies

Donate only new office supplies whenever possible; a 10-year-old box of packaging tape that has become a sticky, gooey mess benefits no one. Other items such as functional staplers may be acceptable as used items; include boxes of staples to go along with any staplers you donate so the donation may be used without additional purchases by the receiving organization.

Finding Recipients

Keep local organizations that you may already support or appreciate in mind -- most organizations or non-profit programs have some sort of office that would benefit from basic supplies such as paper, scissors or paperclips. Call the organization to inform them about your intent to donate, as well as the quantity of items you have to give. An organization using the office supplies within its own office may appreciate a donation of one ream of paper or two extra staplers, while a group that redistributes the supplies to others in need may be able to accept vast quantities of office supplies.

Organizing a Donation Drive

If you feel strongly about donating to a specific organization that needs a large amount of office supplies, such as a program benefiting teachers in a school district under severe budget cuts, ask others to get involved. Ask the manager of your favorite cafe or grocery store if you can set up a donation box in the business; if so, set up a large box with a clearly marked sign indicating the supplies needed, as well as whom the supplies benefit. Pick up the box on the day or days you've arranged in advance with business management. Other places for potential donation drives are office supply stores, a library or a place of worship.

Passing It On

If you're unable to think of a specific non-profit organization you would like to help, consider offering the supplies to an after-school program, an arts-based day camp or even a local small business incubator that helps new businesses get started. Opening a new business requires a great deal of funds, so any supplies donated are bound to be appreciated by new business owners on their new venture.

About the Author

Kathy Adams is an award-winning journalist and freelance writer who traveled the world handling numerous duties for music artists. She writes travel and budgeting tips and destination guides for USA Today, Travelocity and ForRent, among others. She enjoys exploring foreign locales and hiking off the beaten path stateside, snapping pics of wildlife and nature instead of selfies.

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