How to Write Letters of Support for Grants

  Reviewed by: Jayne Thompson, LLB, LLM
  Written by: Stephanie Faris      Updated November 21, 2018
Young businesswoman using her tablet in the office

Organizations rely heavily on grant money, which often means spending at least several weeks each year completing applications to request funding. A letter of support is an important part of any grant request, demonstrating to potential donors that the cause has supporters. If you’ve been asked to write a support letter for a grant, you're likely to feel pressured to do a good job. In actuality, though, you can easily equip yourself to write a winning letter.

Gather Information

Before you get started, it’s important to know as much as possible about the type of letter you’re writing. If you look at a few examples of letters of support, you’ll likely find that many of them have similar elements. From the start, you can see a few essentials you’ll need to put in your letter, including the purpose of the funding and how that money will help the organization further its mission.

On your end, you’ll need to stress the value that the funds will make to the cause, as well as the compelling reasons behind it. For that you’ll need information from the organization on how the money will be spent and what benefits will result from the grant. Apply this information to what you personally know about this organization for a more convincing letter of support. Make sure to ask any questions of the organization that will help you prepare.

Write the Letter of Support

A letter of support for grant money begins with an introduction of its writer. Once you’ve given your name, state the reason you believe the funding is a good idea and present any arguments you have for its benefits to the organization. If it will help a nonprofit to purchase additional equipment that will bring value to members of the community, be specific about the current need for this benefit and the relief it will offer.

To close your letter, mention other organizations that have benefited from this type of support. This could strengthen the nonprofit’s chances of receiving the grant. Sign the letter by stating your own relationship to the organization, whether as a member or simply as someone who supports the work they’re doing. If you have standing in the community that’s notable, it may make an even better impression if you sign using that title.

Being asked to write a letter of support for a grant request is an honor. By taking the time to first ask the organization questions, you’ll have the information you need to create a letter that gets positive results.

Video of the Day

Brought to you by Techwalla
Brought to you by Techwalla

Letter of Support Example

Dear Grants Committee:

As a small business owner in South Central, I'm acutely aware of the problem of aimless children in our neighborhood. Groups that work toward directing these children's energies in positive directions are a huge benefit to our local community.

I support The Kids Collective's request for funding to create an afterschool STEM program in our neighborhood. I believe this project is important because of the real difference it can make in the lives of the children of South Central.

The purchase of instruction booklets, science kits and museum memberships will help the group meet their goal of helping every member get a C grade or better in science and math class in the coming year.

I've seen similar programs do amazing things for children who might not otherwise have any interest in the hard sciences. The group at Northwest now has a science bowl team that's going to the state finals this year.

Please give this proposal your full consideration. If you have any questions I can answer, feel free to contact me at 555-5555.

Thank you,

John D. Businessowner

About the Author

Stephanie Faris is a novelist and business writer whose work has appeared on numerous small business blogs, including Zappos, GoDaddy, 99Designs, and the Intuit Small Business Blog. She worked for the State of Tennessee for 19 years, the latter six of which were spent as a supervisor. She has written about business for entrepreneurs and marketing firms since 2011.

Cite this Article A tool to create a citation to reference this article Cite this Article