Forms of ID Needed for Post Office Boxes

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A post office box is a savior for businesses large and small. It gives you extra security since each box is only accessible by a key or combination, it receives U.S. mail faster than a residential or business address because it's already inside the post office and it protects your personal privacy. Many people who run businesses out of their home opt for post office boxes to avoid giving their personal address to customers and clients. If you run a business that rents its offices, has numerous locations or regularly moves, a post office box can provide a permanent mailing address.

Getting a post office box is simple and affordable. You can apply in person at a post office or online via the U. S. Postal Services' website. You must also fill out a PS Form 1093 and present two forms of valid identification. One of these forms must have a photo and one must prove your address.

Valid Photo IDs

A valid driver's license or passport are two of the most common forms of valid photo ID to purchase a post office box. If you don't have a driver's license, you may opt for a state nondriver's identification card, which you can apply for at your local Department of Motor Vehicles. You can also use your alien registration card, certificate of naturalization or passport card. Identification cards from the armed forces, government, a recognized corporation or university are also valid.

Valid Non-Photo IDs

These valid nonphoto IDs help prove your physical address, just remember they must be accompanied by a valid photo ID. The post office accepts a current lease, mortgage or deed of trust, a voter or vehicle registration card or a home or vehicle insurance policy.

Invalid Forms of ID

Social Security cards, birth certificates and credit or debit cards are not acceptable forms of identification. If you don't have a lease, mortgage or home insurance policy, you can use a voter or vehicle registration card instead.

Filling Out a PS Form 1093

Once you've assembled your two forms of ID, you must fill out a PS Form 1093. This process is similar to filling out any government form. You have to mark whether you're getting a box for business or personal use, the name of your business and your personal information; for example, phone number, name and permanent address. You also must provide a list of all the members of your business that will be retrieving your mail and choose the size of your box. The price of your box is dependent on its size.

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About the Author

Mariel Loveland is a small business owner, content strategist and writer from New Jersey. Throughout her career, she's worked with numerous startups creating content to help small business owners bridge the gap between technology and sales. Her work has been featured in publications like Business Insider and Vice.