IBM Matching Grants

by Elizabeth Layne; Updated September 26, 2017
Businesspeople working on laptops and tablets

Corporate giving programs, including employee matching grant programs, make good sense for the business, the community and employees. The business gets good PR and happier employees, and charities get a boost. The employees appreciate working for a caring business and having opportunities to improve their communities. The IBM Matching Grants Program provides something of a twist in corporate giving programs.

More Than Matching

IBM employees, retirees and board members in the United States provide grants of up to $5,000 through the IBM Matching Grants Program. That equals a total grant of $10,000 to recipient organizations. What's different about IBM's grant program is that the match is made in either cash, IBM stock or IBM products. In addition, IBM doubles the value of the match if it's in IBM equipment and software. Recipients make the pick. Grants are available to Internal Revenue Service tax-exempt universities, schools, hospitals, hospices, nursing homes, cultural institutions and environmental organizations.

How It Works

IBM employees complete and sign a form with the gift recipient's information, indicating the gift complies with the program's provisions. They include the cash or stock donation. An executive of the recipient organization completes its part of the form and countersigns, certifying the organization will use the gift in line with the program's provisions. Gifts cannot tangibly benefit the donor and must be used in support of the organization's mission. To receive IBM equipment or software, recipient organizations make a request to IBM in writing.

About the Author

Located in the mid-Atlantic United States, Elizabeth Layne has covered nonprofits and philanthropy since 1997, and has written articles on an array of topics for small businesses and career-seekers. An award-winning writer, her work has appeared in "The Chronicle of Philanthropy" newspaper and "Worth" magazine. Layne holds a Bachelor of Arts in journalism from The George Washington University.

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