Branding Iron Ideas

by Harry Havemeyer; Updated September 26, 2017
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The earliest known branding took place in Egypt around 2000 B.C. The process was used and remains in use today as a means of indicating ownership of cattle. An iron with a design that is unique to its owner is heated and applied to the cattle to brand them. Ranchers have taken great pride in their brands and some people even create their own branding iron design for the sole purpose of keeping it in their home.

Initials

You can use your initials as the basis for the design on your branding iron. Placing them in sequence is one way to approach this style, while you can also opt for the traditional monogram style. The traditional monogram style features a larger, centrally placed initial for your last name, while your first and middle initial surround the larger letter. The initials of your alma mater or favorite college sports team can also provide you with a design.

Civic Pride

The outline of your home state can provide a starting point for your branding iron design. You can accent this with your area code, or use your area code as the brand itself. Also, consider any symbols that may be associated with your state. The initials of your state can also be incorporated into your design if you are from a state whose outline lacks an easily distinguished shape.

Interests and Industry

Consider using symbols that represent your personal interests or field of employment. Cyclists could use a chain link in their branding iron design, while those with a passion for cars could have their branding iron shaped like a steering wheel. The recycling logo can provide a green-oriented brand for the environmentally conscious rancher or urban cowboy.

Display

Ranchers who are particularly proud of their branding iron design or those with a passion for frontier imagery sometimes display their branding iron in the home, often surrounding it with other rustic items like spurs and saddles. You can have your brand applied to leather and hang it on your wall, or use the branded leather as coasters to create a western motif.

About the Author

Harry Havemeyer began writing in 2000. He has written articles for the "San Antonio Express-News" and the "Tulane Hullabaloo." Havemeyer holds a Bachelor of Arts in political science and philosophy from Tulane University.

Photo Credits

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