How to Word a Formal Invite for a Presentation

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Inviting customers, prospects, partners, investors, industry experts and the media to business events helps your company to make new contacts, develop business relationships and increase sales. Whether you’re hosting an important product launch, grand opening, industry conference or intimate seminar, it’s important to write an invitation letter that speaks to specific elements your target audience needs to know.

Carefully Target Your Guest List

Before you begin writing your invitation letter, carefully select the guest list. Instead of inviting all contacts, it’s best to segment your list based on the kind of information about which your audience will be interested. For example, customers may want to know more specific details about a product version update, whereas investors may not need the details but want to know the bigger picture about the direction of the company.

The content you include in your invitation letter needs to be targeted to your audience. The kind of language you use should align with your overall business brand. For example, if your company has an informal culture, don’t use overly formal invitation wording in your letter.

Select the medium of your invitation based on your audience. Email may be the easiest way to send out invitations, especially if you’re targeting a large group of people. In this case, be sure to use a subject line that captures your reader’s attention immediately, such as, “You’re invited to the launch of the century!” If you’re inviting a small, select group of people to an intimate gathering, you may choose to go with a hard copy invitation sent via mail. This creates the feeling of exclusivity and intrigue.

Focus on the Benefits to the Reader

When you invite people to a presentation, it’s important to frame the content so it relates directly to them. This will help your guests decide if they want to attend. If your invitation only speaks about your business, they may not feel this is the right event for them. Instead, it’s critical that you specify the benefits for your audience in attending the event.

For example, if you’re hosting a small seminar with an industry expert speaker who will talk about how customers can use your product to increase their revenue, don’t fill your invitation with details about your product. Instead, focus on how the guests can learn key insights from the industry expert that will help them increase productivity and make more money.

Don’t Forget the Logistical Details

Your invitation letter for a product presentation or other event should include all of the logistical details, such as:

  • Location.
  • Date and time.
  • Parking and transportation.
  • Dress code if necessary.
  • Pre- or post-presentation events, such as cocktails or brunch.
  • How to RSVP.
  • Deadline for RSVP.

This will ensure your guests have everything they need to make a decision about whether they wish to attend.

Invitation for Product Presentation Sample

Dear John,

Please join us for our inaugural product launch for MacroTech Square. Not only will you be one of the first people to see the technology in action, you’ll also have the opportunity to learn key insights from industry expert Kelly Smith.

Attend the product launch and:

  • Witness revolutionary marketing analytics technology at work.
  • Understand how more insight about your operations can help you make better decisions.
  • Get answers to your industry questions from analytics pioneer Kelly Smith.
  • Take back the latest industry research to share with colleagues.

We can’t wait to share this groundbreaking moment with you.

When: April 2, 2019 | 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Where: MacroTech Headquarters, 123 Main Street

Cocktails will be served after the presentation.

Please RSVP by responding to this email by March 15, 2019. Parking vouchers will be provided to all attendees.

Looking forward to seeing you there,

Anne Kincaid
Manager, MacroTech Systems

References

About the Author

Anam Ahmed is a Toronto-based writer and editor with over a decade of experience helping small businesses and entrepreneurs reach new heights. She has experience ghostwriting and editing business books, especially those in the "For Dummies" series, in addition to writing and editing web content for the brand. Anam works as a marketing strategist and copywriter, collaborating with everyone from Fortune 500 companies to start-ups, lifestyle bloggers to professional athletes. As a small business owner herself, she is well-versed in what it takes to run and market a small business. Anam earned an M.A. from the University of Toronto and a B.A.H. from Queen's University. Learn more at www.anamahmed.ca.

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