How to Change the Address of a California Incorporation

by Anna Assad; Updated September 26, 2017

A California corporation's address must be updated with the Secretary of State when a change occurs. The Secretary of State maintains all of the business filings of the corporation, and the corporation must be registered with the state to conduct business legally. A business that fails to update information with the state department when moving to a new address faces fines for missed state deadlines and may not receive important notices.

Items you will need

  • Statement of Information form
  • Filing fee payment
Step 1

Get the Statement of Information form for the corporation type. A corporation with stock must use Form SI–200C and a nonprofit corporation uses Form SI–100. Use Form SI–350 if the corporation was created outside California, referred to as "foreign." Visit the official website of the California Secretary of State to get the information forms online.

Step 2

Complete the form. Follow the provided instructions. You need the corporation name as on file with the California Secretary of State's office, the new principal address, the names and addresses of three officers -- chief, financial and secretary -- and the registered agent. Stock corporations must include the name and address of at least one director, and stock and foreign corporations must include the business nature. The form must be signed and dated with the signor's corporate title given. Make a copy of the form for safekeeping.

Step 3

Prepare the filing fee payment. Use a check or money order payable to "Secretary of State." The fee for foreign and stock corporations is $25 as of 2011. Nonprofit corporations must submit a $20 fee.

Step 4

Mail the form and the fee to the Secretary of State. All three form types are mailed to: Secretary of State; Statement of Information Unit; PO Box 944230; Sacramento, California 94244-2300.

Tips

  • Change the corporation's address as soon as possible to avoid missing important notices from the Secretary of State.

About the Author

Anna Assad began writing professionally in 1999 and has published several legal articles for various websites. She has an extensive real estate and criminal legal background. She also tutored in English for nearly eight years, attended Buffalo State College for paralegal studies and accounting, and minored in English literature, receiving a Bachelor of Arts.