How to Write Up a Landscaping Proposal

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Writing a proposal for a landscape project establishes a point of reference for you and your potential client. The proposal lays out the scope of the job to be done, establishes timelines, costs and terms of payment. To avoid misunderstanding down the road, include specifics such as the type of plant material to be used and who is responsible for providing machinery and items like flowers and plants.

Interview the potential client. In addition to details about the work to be done, find out what is important to him as it relates to the job. Such information can help you to better anticipate and meet your client’s needs.

Visit the job site with your client, if possible. A first-hand view may reveal issues that your client failed to mention in the interview.

Draft a rough estimate of every aspect of the job such as labor, job materials, and machinery like lawn or riding mowers.

Download a landscaping proposal form from the website of Data Management Corp. Or another business forms printing company. Type your company information and the details of the proposal as laid out on the form. Add another page if you need more space.

aft a rough estimate of every aspect of the job such as labor, job materials, and machinery like lawn or riding mowers.

Download a landscaping proposal form from the website of Data Management Corp. or another business forms printing company. Type your company information and the details of the proposal as laid out on the form. Add another page if you need more space.

If you choose to create your own document ensure that you include particulars such as your contractor license number and the approximate start and end dates of the project.

Type a short cover letter on official letterhead if possible. The document should inform your prospective customer of your interest in the job; briefly state your qualifications for the landscaping work that he is seeking to have done; and refer to the proposal you have attached.

Have a friend or co-worker check your proposal for spelling and grammatical errors. Ask her read it aloud so you can see how well your prospective customer might understand it.

Tips

  • Spell out the dollar amount you are charging the customer. In parentheses, write the dollar amount in numeral form. Include a deadline for a response.

References

About the Author

Angus Koolbreeze has been a freelance writer since 2007. He has been published in a variety of venues, including "He Reigns Magazine" and online publications. Koolbreeze has a Master of Arts in English from Western Michigan University.

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