How to Start a Street Sweeping Company

by Vanessa Cross; Updated September 26, 2017
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Street sweeping is a government function in many communities. Homeowners, co-op housing units and other private residential housing communities, however, often use private contractors for street sweeping. Likewise, organizers of special outdoor events and festivals, as well as commercial retailers, outsource their street cleaning. Whether residential communities or businesses, private street cleaning contracts are there for small business entrepreneurs who are willing to organize cleaning crews or do the work themselves.

Items you will need

  • Brooms
  • Trash pans
  • Uniforms
Step 1

Register with the relevant government agency in your state. You can operate your business as a sole proprietorship or set it up as a corporation of limited liability company. The latter is often a more professional way to organize a business if you hire employees or have steady flow of independent contracts. Consult an attorney to learn about the city, county and state requirements for starting a business.

Step 2

Buy the cleaning tools and equipment. Be sure to buy commercial-grade sweepers or brooms designed for maintenance and industrial use. The Betty-Mills Company, Inc., for instance, is one of the country's leading suppliers of heavy-duty, commercial dust pans, brooms, sweepers and scrubbers, like those manufactured by Rubbermaid.

Step 3

Hire employees. Organize sweeping crews for large projects. The sweeping project itself will determine whether to hire a permanent crew or temporary crew. Check applicants' employment backgrounds and references, or hire a professional employment agency to screen new hires. Train new hires to perform tasks professionally. You can also buy worker uniforms that include overalls and hats that personalized with your logo or name.

Step 4

Advertise your business. The best form of marketing is word-of-mouth. To get first-time clients, however, old-fashioned, door-to-door marketing will work. Create a brochure and mail it to prospective clients. Your reputation will depend on your level of professionalism, the quality of customer service and your reliability. Run ads in directories or publications geared to business-to-business services. A business card can go a long way in establishing your identity.

About the Author

Vanessa Cross has practiced law in Tennessee and lectured as an adjunct professor on law and business topics. She has also contributed as a business writer to news publications such as the "Chicago Tribune" and published in peer-reviewed academic journals. Cross holds a B.A. in journalism, a Juris Doctor and an LL.M. in international business law.

Photo Credits

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