How to Introduce a Newsletter

by Ian Linton; Updated September 26, 2017
Side profile of a young woman reading a newspaper

A newsletter can be an important means of communication for small businesses. It enables them to build relationships by providing customers and prospects with information relevant to their needs at regular intervals. A good introduction sets readers' expectations for the newsletter and provides them with a reason to for read the current issue and look forward to new ones.

Relevance to Readers

The newsletter may offer important technical tips that help readers make better use of a company's products. For example, it might offer advice from independent experts that helps readers improve their company’s performance. The introduction must explain why the newsletter is relevant to readers. If your company produces different versions of a newsletter for different audiences, you should identify the target reader in the introduction.

Content Highlights

To encourage the audience to read on, include a brief summary of the most important information contained in the newsletter. It might take the form of a series of short statements rather than a basic content list. Examples include “An exclusive look at the latest model in our range” or “An authoritative article by one of the country’s leading technical experts.”

Publishing Plans

Give readers an indication of the newsletter's scope by setting out plans for future editions. If you plan to publish at regular intervals, let readers know how frequently they can expect to receive new issues. This might be weekly, monthly or quarterly depending on the nature of your content. Where possible, include information on future content. Examples might include phrases such as “The November issue will include the results of our annual state of the industry review.”

Reader Engagement

A good newsletter should engage readers and encourage them to participate in content selection. Ask readers to provide feedback and publish a selection of comments in each issue. For example, you might preview an article in the newsletter that expresses controversial opinions and invite readers to share their views. Encourage readers to submit tips and suggestions relating to your company’s products and publish them as well.

About the Author

Based in the United Kingdom, Ian Linton has been a professional writer since 1990. His articles on marketing, technology and distance running have appeared in magazines such as “Marketing” and “Runner's World.” Linton has also authored more than 20 published books and is a copywriter for global companies. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in history and economics from Bristol University.

Photo Credits

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