How to Get Clients for an Office Cleaning Business

by Maggie Gebremichael; Updated September 26, 2017
Woman sweeping crumpled up paper

There are several types of clients for an office cleaning business, including small businesses and companies with more than 100 employees. Office cleaning contracts can be lucrative, yet difficult to obtain since many existing businesses already have hired commercial cleaners. By implementing several strategies, you can increase awareness about your office cleaning business and gain more clients.

Attracting Clients

Develop a marketing campaign that clearly identifies your contact information. Even if you work from home, create brochures and business cards that state your company’s name, telephone number, mailing address (post office box), and website.

Highlight reasons why clients should hire your company. For example, emphasize your staff’s flexibility as you handle work during the day and overnight after the client’s business has closed. Describe procedures when dealing with confidential information (for example, recycle specialists available to shred or properly destroy documents).

Approach businesses in a manner with which you are comfortable. Create a list of prospective clients based on location or size and mail them information. If you can successfully cold call or interact with business owners in an unscheduled or unannounced manner, personally deliver information (brochure, flyer, business card) about your business and follow-up after a few days.

Establish a promotion for new clients only. You might offer a 15 or 25 percent discount from standard prices. Advertise about the special in local newspapers, community resources like religious newsletters, or even in businesses where you shop, such as at the mall.

Participate in a fundraiser to help others while increasing awareness about your cleaning business. For example, you might donate a portion of your sales revenues to a local public school or five hours of free cleaning to a disadvantaged family for every commercial cleaning contract established in a certain month.

Offer a referral fee, such as to friends, family members, or existing clients. You might offer five percent of the contract or a flat fee ($25, $50) to a person who provides you with a solid lead.

Tips

  • Be prepared to discuss fees and negotiate with clients. You might charge clients based on cleaning frequency and company size (1,000 square feet cleaned daily), but you should first evaluate the premises.

About the Author

Maggie Gebremichael has been a freelance writer since 2002. She speaks Spanish fluently and resides in Texas. When she is not writing articles for eHow.com, Gebremichael loves to travel internationally and learn about different cultures. She obtained an undergraduate degree with a focus on anthropology and business from the University of Texas and enjoys writing about her various interests.

Photo Credits

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