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How to Change a Combination Dial Lock

by Virginia Franco ; Updated September 26, 2017
Change a Combination Dial Lock

Changing the combination of a dial lock is easy, whether its combination involves three, four or even five numbers. The process involves two basic tasks: erasing your original combination number and then assigning a new one. Once you know the location of your lock's "change" position (most manufacturers make theirs either 11 o'clock or 1 o'clock on the dial), you are ready to change the combination on the lock. Some dial locks require that a key be placed into the back of the lock to move it to a "neutral" mode so a new combination can be accepted.

Rotate the dial three times counterclockwise to the left.

Rotate the dial to the left counterclockwise so that the first number of your old combination stops on you lock's "open" position--or 12 o'clock on the dial. Dial the first number of your combination by turning the dial to the left, going counterclockwise.

Rotate the dial to the right going clockwise, being sure to pass the first number once. On the second rotation, stop turning when the second number of the combination reaches the "open" position.

Rotate the dial to the left going counterclockwise, stopping when the third number of the combination reaches the "open" position.

Open the lock.

Rotate the dial three times counterclockwise to the left.

Rotate the dial to the left counterclockwise so that the first number of your old combination stops on you lock's "change" position--either 11 o'clock or 1 o'clock on the dial. Dial the first number of your combination by turning the dial to the left, going counter-clockwise.

Rotate the dial to the right going clockwise, being sure to pass the first number just once. On the second rotation, stop turning when the second number of the combination reaches the "change" position.

Rotate the dial to the left going counterclockwise, stopping when the third number of the combination reaches the "change" position.

Tips

  • When dealing with locks whose combinations are larger than three numbers, simply add extra rotations on at the beginning, being sure to decrease by one rotation as you scroll through the numbers. For instance, with a four-number combination, you would first tun the knob to the left three times, then two times on the second number, one time on the third, and so on.

About the Author

Based in Charlotte, N.C., Virginia Franco has more than 15 years experience freelance writing. Her work has appeared in various print and online publications, including the education magazine "My School Rocks" and Work.com. Franco has a master's degree in social work with an emphasis in health care from the University of Maryland and a journalism degree from the University of Richmond.

Photo Credits

  • http://1006-w08.wikispaces.com/file/view/singlediallock.jpg
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