Grants for Nonprofit Daycares

by Brooke Williams

Many daycare centers across the United States teach preschool children necessary skills needed to enter grade school, including colors, shapes and numbers. To ensure that nonprofit daycare programs are successful, funding may be needed. There are grant opportunities nationwide that support nonprofit daycare centers.

W.K. Kellogg Foundation

The W.K. Kellogg Foundation financially supports nonprofit organizations throughout the United States, including early childhood development programs, according to the foundation. The foundation benefits programs that implement initiatives that correlate with secure families, healthy kids and educated kids, according to the foundation. Other issues the foundation supports are civic engagement and racial equality. Grant proposals are accepted throughout the year, and there are no specific application deadlines, according to the foundation.

Healthy Sprouts Award

The National Gardening Association (NGA) and Subaru join hands annually to award nonprofit organizations and schools grant funds that benefit a youth-led gardening initiative. Funding programs benefit youth between the ages of 3 and 18. These projects should not only give youth the opportunity to learn gardening, but should also enhance teamwork skills and stress the importance of environmental stewardship and nutrition, according to NGA. Typically, about 30 organizations and schools are funded annually, according to the NGA, and recipients receive a $500 gift certificate to the NGA's gardening catalog, which is chock-full of supplies, tools and seeds. Grant applications are usually due at the beginning of October annually.

Child Care and Development Fund

The Child Care and Development Fund, managed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), awards grants to childcare facilities that serve children from low-income families that are in school, work or are training to work, according to the HHS. Funding benefits state-operated facilities, and grants can be used to enhance the quality of the childcare program, such as the training of daycare staff, according to the HHS.

About the Author

Brooke Williams is a freelance writer living in Alabama. She is a former education and government reporter at a daily newspaper and has been writing since 2003. Williams received her journalism degree from Auburn University. She has written for "Health for Alabama" and "Health for Tennessee" magazines.

Photo Credits

  • little preschooler image by Renata Osinska from Fotolia.com