Ideas for Longevity Awards

business colleagues image by Vladimir Melnik from Fotolia.com

A longevity award is normally given to an employee that has served your organization well for many years. The number of years will depend on your entity's policies. Whether you're looking to honor a loyal employee or a service person that has served for many years, there are a variety of ideas that can help you develop a longevity award.

Show of Appreciation Focus

Most employees will welcome a longevity award, as it demonstrates to them that they are appreciated by their employer or superiors. Present your award at a party or company gathering that honors the person in front of his peers. Create an award that can be signed by management and has an official look with a company seal or logo. You can create a template for an award for your company in a graphics program. Photoshop, GIMP and other graphics programs can create professional-looking awards with graphics, like scrolls or a company logo.

Financial Award Element

Most longevity awards include a financial reward, either in the form of a pay raise or a one-time bonus. Create a set amount for each level of longevity awards; for example, award $100 for five years, $300 for ten years and so on. An award could also be a traditional item, like a gold watch, or it could be something unexpected, like a gift certificate to a restaurant or store. A financial award is an excellent way to show employees that you value the work they do for you.

Create a Unifying Background

A longevity award in which the theme is one of camaraderie and unity can be a great way to promote a sense of teamwork and family at your company. Add a background image, like a photograph of a group of employees standing together, to award certificates. You will need to lower the opacity of any photo you use to a level that will allow text to remain prominent on your document. Alternatively, place a collage image on your longevity award that includes management and employees, as well as family members of both.

References

About the Author

Daniel Ketchum holds a Bachelor of Arts from East Carolina University where he also attended graduate school. Later, he taught history and humanities. Ketchum is experienced in 2D and 3D graphic programs, including Photoshop, Poser and Hexagon and primarily writes on these topics. He is a contributor to sites like Renderosity and Animotions.

Photo Credits

  • business colleagues image by Vladimir Melnik from Fotolia.com