How to Introduce a Citizenship Award

by Katelyn Coyne

Citizenship is defined as the character of a person in terms of how they are viewed as a member of society. Good citizenship connotes a member of society who exceeds the duties and obligations that are functions of being a citizen. Often communities, schools and organizations award good citizenship with a certificate, prize or gathering of some sort. These awards promote good citizenship among all members of any group by highlighting the good work of one individual. Introducing such an award to your community is a noble effort that can bring a community together.

Citizenship Award

Find an organization in your community willing to sponsor the citizenship award. Whether creating a memorial award to honor a good citizen for years to come or to promote community togetherness, at least one community organization or business should sponsor the award to draw an audience from their sector of the community.

Work with a team from this organization and other community members to create the standards by which to measure award applicants. These should include demonstration of times when an individual has been particularly neighborly, charitable, hard working and fair. Also applicants should be proven leaders and generally helpful to those around them.

Create a prize for the winner of the citizenship award. Ask local businesses to donate goods or certificates in exchange for advertising as you seek applicants. Solicit wealthy members of society to donate to a fund for the award.

Post a call for nominations in public places, such as libraries, schools, shops and more. Direct nominators to the application online or provide applications upon request at each location with posted information. Also be sure to share a deadline for applications and a way to submit the application.

Assemble a panel of judges to review the applications and select a winner. Judges should be reputable members of the community and present no bias. Creators of the award should not serve on the panel of judges.

Invite the winner and fellow members of the community to an event where the award will be given. Ask the winner's nominator to speak about the winner's excellent qualities of citizenship.

Things Needed

  • Posters
  • Applications
  • Judges panel
  • Prize

About the Author

Katelyn Coyne has been a freelance writer based out of Indianapolis since 2009. Her areas of expertise include theater, arts, music, dance, literature and popular culture. She has published work for the Indianapolis-based website FunCityFinder.com and other online publications. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in theater with a minor in English from Butler University.

Photo Credits

  • award ribbons on hangers image by Clarence Alford from Fotolia.com