Good Working Conditions for Workers

by Nicholas Pell; Updated September 26, 2017

In many cases, the law may mandate good working conditions. Good working conditions for workers can mean the difference between a high retention rate and losing your employees to greener pastures. To avoid alienating your employees with your work environment, familiarize yourself with what constitutes good conditions. You may find that the investment is well worth the return.

Safety

Above all, a safe workplace is important. No one wants to have to worry about injuries, serious illness or even death when on the job. The concept of safety goes beyond the physical body, however. Strive to create a workplace free of bullying, intimidation and harassment. Not only does this make good sense, it is also a legal issue. Your employees can file complaints with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration or the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission if you fail to do this.

Decor

The way you decorate your workplace can go a long way toward creating good working conditions. In an office environment, having plants around can brighten the place up, bringing life into the workplace. A workplace free of distractions can also make it easier for employees to concentrate. This makes for a workplace with less stress and more productivity. Comfortable seating also contributes to employee satisfaction.

Environment

The workplace environment includes factors such as lighting and temperature. Your office should have adequate lighting. Having many small lamps for people to work with helps to localize lighting. The temperature in a workplace is also important. Your workplace should be warm in the winter and cool in the summer, but never too much of either at any time.

Openness

No matter what type of business you run, your employees want to feel that their contributions are valued. It is thus essential to keep your workplace open. Two-way communication allows you to clearly communicate to your employees what you need and expect from them. It also allows your employees to come to you when they need to. Employees will come to you with problems you want to know about as well as ideas that can increase profitability.

About the Author

Nicholas Pell began writing professionally in 1995. His features on arts, culture, personal finance and technology have appeared in publications such as "LA Weekly," Salon and Business Insider. Pell holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.