How to Assemble Things at Home for Cash

Jupiterimages/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images

Working from home is a dream for many people, and for individuals who enjoy crafting and hobbies, assembling things at home can be a perfect way to earn a little extra money. While there are a lot of scams out there promising you to make hundreds of dollars per hour, there are legitimate work-from-home opportunities. Often the work can be tedious, so you'll want to make sure you have varied items to assemble.

Research the legitimate work-from-home assembly jobs and determine which company you think you would work best with. Companies including New England Crafters, Tiny Details and others offer starter kits that allow you to test out assembling products to determine whether or not you are qualified to participate. Look for companies that are registered with the Better Business Bureau (BBB) to ensure the legitimacy of the work. The most popular companies that offer assemble-at-home work are BBB-certified.

Find leads for assembling things at home by attending craft fairs or talking to wedding planners in your area. You can make a higher per-item rate when you work with individuals versus companies that are trying to mass produce ornaments and trinkets. Wedding planners may have a need for someone to put together favor baskets or custom table arrangements. Offer your services and spread the word that you have an in-home assembly studio.

Set up an Etsy or eBay store if you can make your own unique gifts. The best way to make money assembling things from home is when the majority of the profits are going into your own pockets. Check craft stores and other sites for ideas and inspiration, and if you make something that you think would be popular, make a few and sell them directly. You can then make your own products on demand, only when people order them from you.

References

About the Author

Based in Miami, Kristen Bennett has been writing for business and pleasure since 1999. Bennett's work has appeared online at MarketWatch, The Motley Fool and in several internal company publications. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in economics from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images