How to Sell Used Vacuums

vacuum cleaner image by vb_photo from Fotolia.com

As people search for ways to reduce household spending, buying used home appliances is a viable way to save money. Some appliances, such as vacuums need not be new, they just need to get the job done. Whether you want to try selling used vacuums as a permanent source of income or if you just have one or two that you want to dispose of, here are the steps you can take to market your wares to the public.

Inspect the vacuum and any attachments to confirm that it is in working order. Remove any debris from the vacuum bag, make sure that that the vacuum motor turns on when plugged in, that the suction is strong and that there are no holes in the attachment hoses. Repair the vacuum, if necessary. Note any missing parts or significant defects so you can inform potential owners.

Determine your asking price for the vacuum. Use online sources such as Amazon, Pennysaverusa or eBay to see how much a used appliance dealer is asking for a similar model. When setting a minimum price that you will accept, keep the price within the same range as similar models sold online.

Advertise your vacuum online. Sites such as Pennysaverusa and Craigslist permit you to place free ads for used goods, while listing your vacuum cleaner on eBay will permit people to place bids for it. Take photos of the vacuum cleaner and attachments so that potential buyers can see the vacuum' s condition. Be sure your description accurately portrays the vacuum's condition.

Place an advertisement in a newspaper. Though newspapers seem old-fashioned these days, they are still a viable source for advertising, especially in small towns. Take out a small ad for a short period of time and market your used vacuum and ask the newspaper to place the ad on their online site as well.

Approach local used appliance stores and thrift shops. Some shops may be willing to buy the vacuum outright, others will take it on consignment, paying you a portion of the proceeds upon sale. Used vacuum retailers may be willing to purchase a broken vacuum so they can use its parts.

References

About the Author

Trudie Longren began writing in 2008 for legal publications, including the "American Journal of Criminal Law." She has served as a classroom teacher and legal writing professor. Longren holds a bachelor's degree in international politics, a Juris Doctor and an LL.M. in human rights. She also speaks Spanish and French.

Photo Credits