How to Remodel a Commercial Bathroom

bathroom image by Gina Smith from Fotolia.com

When remodeling a commercial bathroom it is important to remember the needs of those who use it while installing durable products. According to All Dura, almost 30 percent of over 1,000 American polled said they avoid public bathrooms due to the fear of germs. Protecting the users by using sanitary and environmentally safe products gives them confidence and helps ensure them you have their interest at heart. Remodeling a commercial bathroom to make it more sanitary requires an initial investment, but using products that prevent waste helps cover the expense.

Install a floor that is economical and durable. A good choice for a commercial bathroom is ceramic tile. Ceramic tile comes in a variety of colors, offers a resilient finish and lasts well in high-moisture areas.

Paint the walls a neutral color with a paint that is washable or use a commercial grade, neutral-colored wall tile. Neutral colors will not show dirt or stains as much as bright, vibrant colors. Also, cleaning neutral colors with products that disinfect commercial bathrooms is easier.

Use sinks that do not require pedestals or cabinets under them in a commercial bathroom. Bolt the sinks to the walls to help prevent leaks. The sinks with automatic sensors help prevent the spread of germs and save money by turning the water off automatically when no one is using them.

Install an electric, air hand dryer that mounts to the wall that is specifically designed for commercial use. These types of dryers prevent waste from paper towels and are sanitary.

Attach a soap dispenser to the bathroom wall that is automatic. Automatic dispensers save money by reducing waste and keep the area sanitary since the user does not have to touch the dispenser.

Place an automatic flushing, commercial grade commode or urinal in each bathroom. Using auto-flushing allows for less cleaning time and is more sanitary since the person using the commode does not have to touch the handle. Include a handicap bar beside the commode to conform to commercial bathroom standards.

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About the Author

Amanda Maddox began writing professionally in 2007. Her work appears on various websites focusing on topics about medical billing, coding, real estate, insurance, accounting and business. Maddox has her insurance and real estate licenses and holds an Associate of Applied Science in accounting and business administration from Wallace State Community College.

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