How to Set Up Your Own Cleaning Business

by Lisa Wampler - Updated September 26, 2017
Be sure to do the necessary paperwork when setting up a cleaning business

The dream of being your own boss can become a reality in a few steps. A cleaning business can be profitable; not only do busy homeowners look for help with housecleaning, businesses do, too. The amount of money you make depends on the type of cleaning business you set up. Depending on if you want to start a home service or an office service and whether you want to work alone or hire people to work with you will make a difference in profit. There is a legal aspect to setting up a cleaning business. That should be addressed before going out and getting clients.

Decide on a business name. A good idea is to have "Residential & Commercial Cleaning Services" as part of the business name. This opens your business to homeowners and businesses.

Get your business licensed. Research the guidelines your state has in place for the operation of a small business. Your small business may require certain permits as well.

Create a client contract. It is important to have a clear outline of your policies and procedures as well as any stipulations you may have regarding your business. You should also have a checklist set up for yourself; as you complete tasks, check them off. Hand this in to the client when you finish the job.

Insure your business. Insurance is the piece of mind you need to cover any unfortunate happenings. If you accidentally break an item while cleaning you will want insurance to cover the cost, rather than pay for it out of pocket--especially if the item is expensive. If you plan to clean commercial properties, you will most likely be required to have insurance before any business will hire you.

Get bonded. Bonding protects yourself and your business against theft. If a client accuses you of stealing and law enforcement is involved, an investigation occurs. If found guilty, the bond pays out and you are required to then pay back the bond. Bonding is not necessary, but highly encouraged for your own protection. Your insurance provider can help you with getting your business bonded.

Photo Credits

  • executive business strategy image by bluefern from Fotolia.com
Cite this Article A tool to create a citation to reference this article Cite this Article