How to Choose a Name for a Spiritual Business

Choosing a spiritual business name can be challenging. The name should be something memorable, something unique and also something that has meaning for the business’s owner and its clientele. Choosing a spiritual business name that works requires more than creativity: it requires research.

Research Competing Businesses’ Names

The first step in choosing a spiritual business name is researching other spiritual store names in your region. Having a name that is too similar to another store can confuse customers. Do not just research other spiritual stores, though. With your short list of potential names handy, determine whether there are other businesses of any kind using similar names in your area.

Avoiding names that are already in use or close to those already in use can keep your business from being overlooked or confused for another.

Another reason to research other businesses’ names is that you cannot register a business name that is already in use in your state. Business names are registered at the state level, so you can register Hecate’s Hideaway in Kansas even if another store by that name is registered in New York, but you cannot register a new business called Hecate’s Hideaway in New York.

Keep in mind that your potential customers will likely find your store on the internet, and even if there is another store with the same name in a different state, customers may be confused by web searches that return results for the other store.

Be Clever and Be Unique

Do not be afraid to choose a name or consider spiritual business name suggestions that reference specific ideas or spiritual practices. Unique names stand out against other companies operating in the new age and spiritual space, and uncommon names can pique customers’ interest and draw them into your shop.

Write out all your ideas on a sheet of paper. Use ideas you have had for your business’s name and keywords you associate with the business, like words that relate to its mission statement or the community it serves. If there is a specific deity with whom you work, consider working that deity’s name or a reference to him into your business’s name, like "The Red Mug" as a reference to honoring Papa Legba.

Spiritual Store Names That Resonate

Not all spiritual businesses are stores. Some are practices, like private Reiki practices or faith-based counseling centers. Many yoga studios also incorporate spiritual practices into their activities, making them spiritual businesses within the health and wellness space.

To find spiritual business name suggestions, consider what your business does. Direct references to your practice or chosen modality are an effective way to connect with your target clientele, while a more generic name will draw in clients from a variety of practice backgrounds.

For example, a store that primarily serves the Wiccan population might choose a name like:

  • Four Quarters
  • Persephone’s Return
  • So Mote It Be

A spiritual yoga studio might instead use a name like:

  • Chakra Opener
  • Intentional Health and Healing
  • Pure Potential

Get Feedback From Customers

Ask for feedback and spiritual business name suggestions from people close to you. Ask people from various backgrounds to weigh in on the spiritual store names you are considering because although a spiritual practitioner and a small business owner have different perspectives on what will work and what will not work for your business, both perspectives are valid and valuable to you.

Feedback from customers can also help you avoid inadvertently offending members of specific spiritual communities. Sometimes, phrases and terms that are harmless in most conversations have negative connotations or are outright derogatory within certain groups. Work with community feedback to find a name that is unique, inclusive and inoffensive.

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About the Author

Lindsay Kramer has been a full-time writer since 2014. In that time, she's experienced the ups, downs and crazy twists life tends to take when you're launching, building and leading a small business. As a small business owner, her favorite aspect about writing in this field is helping other small business owners and aspiring entrepreneurs become more fluent in the terminology and concepts they face in this role. Previously, she's written on entrepreneurship for 99designs and covered business law topics for law firms.