How to Make a Scentsy Display Stand

by Jennifer Williams; Updated September 26, 2017

Scentsy scented wax warmers are referred to as wickless or flameless candles, the greatest selling point of which is the infusion of scent provided without the danger of a live flame. Scentsy products range from pot-shaped electric scented wax warmers with attached electrical cords to smaller plug-ins. A Scentsy display stand need only be a double window picture frame. Display Scentsy promotional information in one window and in the other install a dual socket extension cord/splitter and cover it with a ceramic face plate.

Items you will need

  • Double window picture frame, 3-by-5-inch, free-standing
  • 3-by-5-inch Scentsy information card
  • Dual socket electrical splitter
  • Dual socket face plate, ceramic
  • Hot glue gun
  • Tape
  • Extension cord
Step 1

Remove any glass or Plexiglas from the face of the picture frame.

Step 2

Glue the face plate over one of the two windows in the frame with hot glue. Turn the frame over. Apply hot glue to the back side of the face plate and fit the sockets of the dual socket electrical splitter into the face plate holes. Let the glue dry.

Step 3

Insert a Scentsy promotional card or information sheet into the remaining opening in the frame and tape it in place at the back side of the frame.

Step 4

Attach an extension cord to the splitter installed into the display frame. Plug the other end into a wall socket.

Step 5

Display both types of Scentsy products with the picture frame display stand. Stand the frame up on a flat surface and plug a Scentsy plug-in into the top socket in the display frame. Plug the cord of a Scentsy wax warming pot into the lower socket. Set the pot in front of the frame.

References

About the Author

An attorney for more than 18 years, Jennifer Williams has served the Florida Judiciary as supervising attorney for research and drafting, and as appointed special master. Williams has a Bachelor of Arts in communications from Jacksonville University, law degree from NSU's Shepard-Broad Law Center and certificates in environmental law and Native American rights from Tulsa University Law.