How to Make a Step and Repeat Banner

by Audrey Farley; Updated September 26, 2017

A step and repeat banner is a backdrop that displays the logos or names of advertisers or sponsors. The purpose of a step and repeat banner is for the sponsor to advertise through photographs taken. Often, athletes hold press conferences in front of a step and repeat banner, and celebrities pose in front of step and repeat banners at red carpet and other promotional events. Step and repeat banners can be made at home.

Design a pattern for the banner on a sketch pad. For instance, design a checkerboard pattern by alternating two logos or two colors of logos in rows and columns so that they align diagonally. For a simple step and repeat banner, use the same logo and color.

Cover a wall with white paper. Cut large strips from a paper roll, and attach them to the wall using tacks. Avoid using tape, glue or spray adhesive, which will cause bumps and unevenness. Alternatively, paint a wall white. Use a roller brush and pan to apply the paint coat evenly.

Make stencils for the logo. Use an exact-o knife to cut the logo out of a piece of card stock. Make a stencil for each color of paint to be used. Make the logo at least 12 inches by 12 inches, so that it is big enough to visibly appear in photographs.

Mark the spots on the wall where the logos will be placed, using a measuring stick to keep rows and columns even. Ideally, allow at least 12 inches on all sides of the logo to create contrast. Stencil the logo onto the backdrop, beginning with the first row on the top. Use a step ladder to reach the top. Tape the stencil directly over the spot marked and spray paint. Allow the banner two hours to fully dry before touching.

About the Author

Audrey Farley began writing professionally in 2007. She has been featured in various issues of "The Mountain Echo" and "The Messenger." Farley has a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of Richmond and a Master of Arts in English literature from Virginia Commonwealth University. She teaches English composition at a community college.

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