What Is a Staple Industry?

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Products found within a staple industry represent a stable and continuous required product used by the general public. Food and personal hygiene items are two examples considered part of a staple industry whether in manufacturing or retail sales.

Food and Beverages

A man shops for wine at a supermarket.
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People need food to survive, so this staple is one that will never disappear. Beverages go along with food as being a necessity.

Personal Hygiene Products

Toothbrushes in a cup on a bathroom sink.
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Personal hygiene products such as soap, toothpaste, deodorant and shampoo are purchased as regularly as food and are an important staple.

 

Cleaning Items

A woman mops a bathroom floor.
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Laundry detergent as well as household cleaners are other items considered to be valuable staples for the public. Procter & Gamble, for example, is a large company within a staple industry.

 

Miscellaneous Staples

A man holds a cigarette.
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Beer, tobacco and vitamin supplements round out the staples industry because they are purchased and used in homes regularly as part of life.

 

Trading Staple Commodities

Close-up of beer cans
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Staple industries include commodities that are traded daily on the stock market according to people's needs. Two of the top traded firms are beer maker Anheuser-Busch (BUD) and household products provider Procter & Gamble (PG).

 

References

About the Author

Kate Eglan-Garton is a professional writer, literary agent and editor. Writing since 1985, she is a past business owner, interior decorator and magazine editor that has used her knowledge to write interesting pamphlets and magazine articles. Her education includes certification in writing, a degree in interior design and an associates degree in business.

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