How to Mount a Projection Screen in a Dropped Ceiling

A dropped ceiling affords an opportunity to mount a remote-controlled projection screen that tucks neatly away when not in use. On the other hand, it also allows for permanently mounting a projection screen if creating a home theatre screening room. Take note of the light surrounding the screen and the area from which the image projects and minimize as much as possible. With a few tools, this is a project the avid do-it-yourselfer can complete and save money in the process.

Cut a piece of 3/4-inch plywood that is the same size as the screen’s mounting bracket using a table saw.

Set the mounting bracket on top of the plywood and mark the locations of the screw holes with a pencil. Use a power drill to make the marked holes and drive the threaded rods all the way through the holes until the heads of the rods are touching the wood.

Remove the dropped ceiling tiles in the location where you want to install the screen and attach the plywood to the joists directly above with a power drill and screws. The rods should be pointing downward when you attach the plywood.

Drill holes in the removed ceiling tiles in order to allow the threaded rods through for a permanent mounting. Reset the tiles back into the ceiling frame. If mounting a retractable screen, reconfigure the tiles for leaving a permanent slot the width of the screen.

Slide the mounting bracket over the threaded rods and slip a washer over each rod. Tighten the bracket against the ceiling tile using a nut on each of the rods and secure the nuts with a wrench.

Hang the projection screen from the mounting bracket and use the included hardware to attach them together.

Tips

  • Measure the depth of your drop ceiling before buying the threaded rods to ensure they are long enough.

Warnings

  • Do not exceed the weight capacity of the ceiling tiles or the screen will fall and get damaged.

References

About the Author

Based in West Windsor, New Jersey, Kelly Brown has been writing health and travel related articles since 1999. Her work has appeared in “Salon” magazine and “Better Health” magazine. Brown holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from the Southern Connecticut State University.