Pharmacy Etiquette

by Carol Adams; Updated September 26, 2017
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If you are working in a pharmacy, or are hoping to be employed in one soon, there are many aspects of the work you have to take very seriously, such as handling drugs in a responsible and organized way. One aspect is etiquette. People who are unwell take that situation seriously, and want you to treat them with respect.

Telephone Etiquette

One of the keys to providing excellent service to your pharmacy customers is practicing proper etiquette on the phone. Answer the phone promptly. If the caller had to wait, apologize. Give the name to the store, your name and the department you are in. Ask how you can help. Listen fully and provide the help or advice the caller needs. End any conversation by thanking the customer and saying goodbye.

Customer Service

No matter what mood you are in or what might have gone wrong at the pharmacy that day, you need to greet customers in a friendly and professional way. Call the customer by name and listen to what he has to say without performing some other task at the same time. Assist her quickly and efficiently, and if there will be a delay of any kind, inform her so she has the option of coming back later. End each conversation courteously, thanking the customers for their patronage.

Employee Relations

An important part of pharmacy etiquette is making sure you interact well with your fellow employees as well as the professional appearance you project through those interactions. Respond to questions and statements in a courteous way, and assist co-workers as promptly as you can when they request assistance. Do not have personal conversations or take personal telephone calls in front of customers. Do not talk about other workers, store problems or other confidential pharmacy matters with or in front of customers.

Privacy

Treat your customer's privacy with respect. Do not discuss his medications or conditions with other customers. Do not talk about customers after they leave while other customers are standing there. Do not discuss off-the-job matters related to customers or other private pharmacy matters. Do not reveal customer information over the phone to unknown third parties, regardless of what she says her relationship is to the customer.

About the Author

Carol Adams has been writing since 2009. She writes about graphics, 3D and video software for various websites. Adams earned a Bachelor of Arts in history from the University of North Carolina at Pembroke and a Master of Arts in liberal arts from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington.

Photo Credits

  • préparatrices en pharmacie image by cédric chabal from Fotolia.com