How to Write an Informal Proposal

by David Stewart; Updated September 26, 2017

An informal proposal is a means of defining a project in terms of its necessity. A well written proposal can clarify an issue by identifying the impact of current situations and proposing a viable solution. This document is useful to collect feedback and suggestions in the initial stages of a project. Although the specifics will vary, an informal proposal should include a summary and an introduction giving relevant background information. You will need to provide details of the action you are proposing with a critical analysis in terms of merits, probable drawbacks and a cost estimate.

Step 1

Use a memorandum format at the beginning of the proposal. Include “To,” “From,” “Date,” and “Subject” fields. Specify both the name and designation in the “To,” and “From” sections. Ensure the subject line states your purpose with clarity.

Step 2

Write out the summary of your proposal defining your project and include a synopsis of the proposal highlights. Write your summary last, after writing the entire proposal, to focus on its main points. Follow with an introduction describing the current issue or problem and what steps you took to arrive at the solution as outlined by you.

Step 3

Provide details describing the steps you will take to accomplish your proposed project. Explain why these steps are necessary, the cost involved and the effect of implementing change. Offer an analysis of the merits of implementing your proposal including addressing problems that may take place as your project unfolds.

Step 4

Include an action statement, stating your recommendation in precise, strong terms: what you want done, who will carry out specific tasks and a time frame for when various steps will be undertaken and the project completed. Attach relevant documents including budget estimates, drawings and plans to support your outline.

Tips

  • For long term projects, provide a tentative timeline giving details of dates by which you expect each step to be completed, important when you are writing an informal proposal requesting funding for long term projects.

About the Author

Hailing out of Pittsburgh, Pa., David Stewart has been writing articles since 2004, specializing in consumer-oriented pieces. He holds an associate degree in specialized technology from the Pittsburgh Technical Institute.