How to Write a Proposal for Employment

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No matter how skilled and experienced you are, finding the right job can be a challenge. However, just because the perfect position doesn't exist doesn't mean your skills aren't in demand. Taking the initiative and writing a proposal for employment can show an employer that you are an aggressive, dedicated worker who is clearly willing to invest in the company. The job proposal should be thorough and highlight all of the most important details the employer needs to know.

No matter how skilled and experienced you are, finding the right job can be a challenge. However, just because the perfect position doesn't exist doesn't mean your skills aren't in demand. Taking the initiative and writing a proposal for employment can show an employer that you are an aggressive, dedicated worker who is clearly willing to invest in the company. The job proposal should be thorough and highlight all of the most important details the employer needs to know.

Write an introduction that begins with a brief description of the company, or company division, in which you are proposing a job. Summarize the company's mission and clientele in a positive light.

Follow with a statement that politely points out a problem or area of improvement within the company's personnel (positions, not individual workers). For example, highlight a duty that is not being performed well or at all, or point out a specific product whose sales lag behind the others.

Write the official employment proposal, which is a full summary of the job position that you believe will solve this problem or address this issue. Include a job description that mentions your specific skill set, who you will oversee and who will supervise you, what the salary is and how the job will fit into the department. Use financial predictions to show how creating this position will benefit the company and how much it will cost to implement.

Add an appendix to the end of your proposal, which is a collection of all of the documents you used in your research, such as charts and graphs of financial predictions.

Write a cover letter to preface your proposal. Introduce yourself to the employer and explain that you are proposing a new position. Point out the problem or area that needs improvement, then highlight the main reason you believe this position will solve that problem. End with a call to action, encouraging the employer to consider your proposal and mentioning how you will be in touch next. Place the cover letter on top of the proposal, or send it to the employer before sending the full proposal.

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About the Author

Kara Page has been a freelance writer and editor since 2007. She maintains several blogs on travel, music, food and more. She is also a contributing writer for Suite101 and has articles published on eHow and Answerbag. Page holds a Bachelor of Music Education degree from the University of North Texas.

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