How to Sell Candy Bars

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Many schools and organizations promote the sale of candy bars as a way to generate additional income for extra-curricular activities and new or necessary resources. Generally, a third-party company provides the school or organization with the candy bars, and students or club members are required to sell them, keeping a percentage of the profit for their purposes. The best way to maximize selling potential is to come up with a solid plan of attack for optimum sales.

Research the companies that make the candy bars to become familiar with their products and pricing. Find out how long they've been in business and make notes of any special awards or accolades they've received. Read the ingredients in the candy so that you can answer any questions buyers might have regarding allergies or harmful chemicals. Invest a little of your own money in order to sample the product to determine how good the candy actually is. Customers may want to know if you have tried the candy yourself and if you would recommend it.

Calculate the price you want to charge, based on the amount you are paying for the candy. Fundraising.com says profit margins for selling candy usually range from 50 percent (for smaller quantities) to 60 percent--the more candy you buy, the less you will pay for it and the more money you can make.

Determine the best place to sell your candy bars in order to make the most money in the shortest amount of time. Consider the time of day and stick to high-traffic areas like a park at lunchtime or a parking lot across the street from the movie theater right before show times.

Get permission to sell at your location, if necessary. Fundraising parties do not require a legal permit to sell candy bars; however, you will need permission from a property owner to sell on his or her property, if that property is private. Call ahead to plead your case, and kindly ask for permission to use the area, during a specified time, for the good of your organization.

Advertise prior to the sale. Because so many people rely on bank cards for daily purchases, it would be very helpful to your customers to know about the sale ahead of time, so that they will be ready with cash on hand. For example, place a small sign advertising “Candy Sale Tomorrow from 2-4 p.m. $1 per bar” in the area you plan to be working. You could also hand out fliers in a school or a workplace as a reminder to bring money.

Display the product. A good visual is sometimes all it takes to persuade someone to try something new. Lay out a few candy bars for people to see. Open one so people can look at and smell the chocolate. The smell alone could persuade someone who is hungry and happens to be passing by. Even a good photo or drawn picture can help boost sales.

Go to the bank before you start selling and have at least $20 in change available. The ability to make change may make or break sales for people carrying around larger bills.

Tips

  • Smile and be friendly. You don't want to scare away potential customers.

    Use your voice. Get people's attention by politely offering the candy out loud.

Warnings

  • Stay out of the sun or bring a cooler. Candy bars can melt rather quickly.

References

About the Author

Diane Todd holds a Bachelor of Arts in mass communication from North Carolina State University and is a former video and web producer for a North Carolina multimedia agency. She also spent several years as a media specialist/graphics designer for the Cumberland County school system in Fayetteville, N.C.

Photo Credits

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