How to List a Board of Directors

by Nancy Karas; Updated September 26, 2017
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Investors and other members of the public are frequently interested in who serves on the board of directors of a given organization. If you need to make a list of your organization's board of directors, you have options depending on the board members' background and involvement. The more information you provide when you list a board of directors, the more credibility and authority the list will convey.

Step 1

List board members alphabetically by last name. This is the simplest and most common way to list board members. The exception is the name of the chairman or chairwoman of the board -- put that name first, followed by the rest in alphabetical order. Here is an example:

ABC Company Board of Directors

Jane Smith, Chairwoman of the Board John Doe Mary Franklin Roberta Johnson Mark Peterson Tom Thomas

Step 2

List each board member's current title and organization. Doing so will add credibility to your organization and to the board's expertise. Here is how the example looks:

ABC Company Board of Directors

Jane Smith, Chairwoman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, ABC Company

John Doe Chief Operating Officer, ABC Manufacturers Inc.

Mary Franklin Corporate Counsel, Big Hotels International

Roberta Johnson Retired Chief Executive Officer, National Shipping Corp.

Mark Peterson Chief Financial Officer, Accounting Partners Inc.

Tom Thomas Vice Chairman, Online Shoppers Inc.

Step 3

List any board committees each person serves on. Boards of directors typically have committees such as an audit and compliance committee, a finance committee and a compensation committee. You can either list each person's committee involvement as part of your main list, or make separate lists showing the membership of the committees.

Step 4

If applicable, indicate each board member's term of service (e.g., 2008-2011) or his length of service on the board (e.g., Director since 2008).

Step 5

List other board memberships. Many directors serve on more than one board. It is appropriate to list these other engagements; this contributes to transparency about each member's interests and priorities, and it enhances the board's stature.

About the Author

Nancy Karas has been a writer and editor since 1980. She writes travel, legal and parenting articles for eHow. Karas majored in English and journalism at DePaul University and the University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.

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