How to Start My Own Traveling Phlebotomist Business

by Marie Wright; Updated September 26, 2017
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To start your own traveling phlebotomist business, you first need training and certification to draw blood. As a phlebotomist, you may use your skills at blood drives, medical offices that sends blood work to labs for analysis, or to visit a patient at home who may be too ill to travel. As a traveling phlebotomist, you could make your own schedule and work out of your car, so you must have a reliable vehicle. This type of business doesn't require any overhead as your work location changes constantly. However, you will need to do a few things before starting your business as a traveling phlebotomist.

Step 1

Form your business entity. If you are working solo, filing as a sole practitioner may work best. However, if you have a partner, then filing as a partnership may work better. Consultant a tax account or an attorney for further advice on this matter.

Step 2

Select a name for your traveling phlebotomist business. If you decided on a name different from your own, depending on your state, you may also need to file a "Doing Business As" (DBA) form with the secretary of state's office for your state. Your bank may also requiest a DBA at the time you open a business checking account. You can file for a DBA at your secretary of state's office, or online at your state's initials.gov (replace the words "your state's initials" with the initials of your state). For example, if you live in South Carolina you would search online at www.sc.gov.

Step 3

Obtain your license to operate a business. Each state has different requirements; however, most states require you file at least a business license and that can be done online through your local online state.gov office or in person at the county clerk's office. The filing fee varies from state to state, but it is usually less than $100. Please note that other local permits may also be required. For example, depending on the state, a local health permit may be required for your type of business. Obtain specific details through your county clerk's office.

Step 4

Open a business checking account for your business using your DBA if you have one. This checking account should be used only to operate your business. Never use it for personal activities. This will help keep business and pleasure separate come tax time.

Step 5

Set up a billing system for your traveling phlebotomist business. This can be done with various accounting software or, to begin with, you could use a basic spreadsheet program. You will send your invoice directly to the client (lab, physician's office, medical group) and, in turn, they will pay you for your services.

Step 6

Purchase business insurance. Business insurance protects you and your client in case of injury or damage to property. Contact your present insurance carrier for your vehicle to see if they offer business insurance. You may be able to get a better price combining both your car, home and business.

Step 7

Create advertising pieces to go. Make business cards for your traveling phlebotomist service. Many online services offer free business cards for new customers. If you have a little money in your budget to splurge, you could make a glossy your business card, but this choice is strictly optional. While there, consider making a brochurelisting prices. Or you could use the back-of-the-card feature and include your pricing on the back of your business cards, making it more convenient for your potential clients.

Step 8

Promote your traveling phlebotomist services anywhere and everywhere that you think will get clients, particularly local labs in your area. Pass out cards on a regular basis to office managers of medical groups and physician offices as they may be able to use your service for home patients. Advertise your services in local medical journals. You could also visit nursing homes which might need your services.

Step 9

Stock up on labels and blood-collecting supplies. As a traveling phebotomist, you must draw blood and label it correctly. When working in the field, unlike working directly in an office setting, having a workstation may present a challenge. You must provide a way to collect blood, label it correctly and store it for delivery.

About the Author

Marie Wright has been writing professionally since 2008, writing business start-up, health and fitness, alternative medicine and craft articles. She is also a contributor to eHow. Wright earned a Bachelor of Science in business management from Hostra University.

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