Basic Building Security Procedures

by George N. Root III; Updated September 26, 2017
Secure your building to protect your visitors and employees.

Making a commercial building secure means protecting the employees that work in the building as well as any visitors. There are some basic building security procedures that should be followed to help keep traffic in and out of the building organized, and to make sure that the building is secure when no one is supposed to be in it. By following security procedures and limiting off-hours access, a building can be made safer and more secure.

Schedule of Hours

Security is not just locks and security guards, it is also a set of procedures designed to keep the building safe. Develop a schedule for deliveries that is strictly adhered to, and work with delivery companies to develop a schedule that will allow your company to receive shipments. Delivery companies can put your location at a specific point in their daily delivery schedule to make sure that they arrive during your posted hours. Do not accept deliveries outside of the posted hours. Create a schedule of hours for visitors as well, and do not allow visitors outside those scheduled times. Work with the managers in your company to develop an office-hours schedule to cover the times when a majority of the employees will be in and out of the building. Employees working outside of the scheduled office hours will need permission from management.

Secure all Doors and Windows

Have delivery doors locked when not in use. Only allow certain people to have the key. Install a badge-entry system that only allows employees with a badge to enter the building during office hours. Employees working off hours should only be allowed to enter and leave the building through the security guard station. First-floor windows should be closed and locked. If first-floor windows need to be opened, they should only be opened by a security guard.

Video

Video surveillance should be installed at all entrances, delivery doors and along the walls of the first floor. A video security surveillance guard should be able to see all possible areas of entrance to the building on the first floor, and there should also be cameras that offer a wide view of the surrounding grounds and the parking lot. If possible, cameras should be set up directly in the parking lot to get a good view of vehicles as they come and go.

Parking

The parking lot should be reserved for employees only, with the exception of spots designated for visitors. Employees should be required to display a parking pass in the windows of their vehicles at all times, and any vehicle that does not display a parking pass should be towed from the lot. Employees should also be required to register the make, model, color and license plate number of their vehicles with security to ensure that parking passes are not being used on non-employee vehicles.

About the Author

George N. Root III began writing professionally in 1985. His publishing credits include a weekly column in the "Lockport Union Sun and Journal" along with the "Spectrum," the "Niagara Falls Gazette," "Tonawanda News," "Watertown Daily News" and the "Buffalo News." Root has a Bachelor of Arts in English from the State University of New York, Buffalo.

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