Grants From Proctor & Gamble

by Lindsey Thompson; Updated September 26, 2017
Toothbrushes on bathroom sink

Proctor & Gamble is one of the top health and beauty product companies in the world, with about $83 billion in annual revenue as of 2014. The company works to give back some of that money by offering grants to various nonprofits and charitable organizations, as well as non-governmental organizations and intergovernmental organizations.

Qualified Grant Projects

To be eligible for a grant from Proctor & Gamble, the project must align with the United Nations Millennium Development Goals, which Proctor & Gamble follows. These goals concentrate on housing, sanitation and child and maternal health. The project must also fall under one of two areas. The first is providing everyday essentials like hygiene products to those who cannot afford them or who have been displaced from their homes. The second is offering hygiene and healthy living education.

Eligible Grant Recipients

Grant recipients must be public nonprofit organizations with 501(c)(3) tax exempt status; political subdivisions such as police stations, public parks or public libraries; or accredited colleges or universities. Along with hygiene and product grants, Proctor & Gamble provides colleges and universities with up to $10,000 in grant money to create curricula that prepare students for the business field. Grant money cannot go to individuals, endowments, organizations with any religious or political affiliations or conferences.

Grant Application Process

Organizations interested in a grant from Proctor & Gamble can visit the company's website and navigate to its Social Responsibility page. The organization will be asked to take a short survey to see if it qualifies. If the organization qualifies through the survey, it is directed to the online grant application.

About the Author

Lindsey Thompson began her writing career in 2001. Her work has been published in the Cincinnati Art Museum's "Member Magazine" and "The Ohio Journalist." Thompson holds a Bachelor of Science in journalism from the Scripps School of Journalism at Ohio University.

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