Teamwork & Safety

construction worker image by Greg Pickens from Fotolia.com

When one or two employees prioritize safety in their workplace, the work environment is somewhat safer than it would be if nobody prioritized worker safety. When every member of a team takes safety seriously and upholds the company and industry’s safety requirements, the workplace is overall a much safer environment for everybody who enters, including workers, customers and vendors.

This is why it is so important for employees to understand that safety is a team effort and for employers to emphasize this point at all safety meetings. Employers can protect their employees and customers by discussing workplace safety regularly and encouraging employees to be active in maintaining safe workplace practices.

Holding a Teamwork Safety Talk

Employers who are not sure how to start their teamwork safety talks can use one or more teamwork safety quotes as starting points. A team leader can search the internet to find valuable teamwork safety slogans that are generic enough to fit any type of workplace as well as teamwork safety quotes that speak specifically to their industry.

A few examples of teamwork safety quotes that leaders can use to start discussions about specific ways to be safe in the workplace include:

  • An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
  • A faulty wire can start a fire.
  • Safety begins with teamwork.
  • If you see something, say something.

Some of these quotes were not originally created as workplace safety guides but can be adapted for their use. “If you see something, say something” was originally coined by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to encourage citizens to report suspicious activity to law enforcement, but the phrase works equally well as a way to encourage employees to report unsafe workplace conditions to their supervisors.

Using Teamwork Safety Slogans

One way a team leader can make her teamwork safety talk more engaging is to challenge employees to come up with their own teamwork safety slogans to post around the workplace. Employees can work individually or on teams to create catchy, memorable safety slogans and illustrate posters bearing them.

Beyond creating slogans and leaning on them for safety education, employers should point to real-life workplace accident statistics during safety meetings. A few key statistics to discuss include:

  • In 2017, 5,147 American workers died in workplace accidents.
  • More than 20 percent of employee deaths recorded in 2017 were in the construction industry.
  • Among construction industry deaths, approximately 39 percent were from falls.
  • For every 59,000 U.S. workers, there is only one OSHA compliance officer.

These discussions should also involve the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s general workplace safety regulations as well as any relevant industry-specific safety regulations it maintains. Certain industries, like construction and maritime operations, are subject to safety regulations beyond those imposed on most U.S. employers.

Why Teamwork Is Crucial to Safety

A workplace where only a few employees are committed to safety is not a safe workplace. During safety talks and training sessions, supervisors should emphasize how important it is that every member of the team commit himself to following proper safety protocols and holding his colleagues accountable for their safety-related actions. When one employee fails to follow safety protocol, everybody in the workplace faces an injury risk.

One teamwork safety slogan, “there’s safety in numbers,” speaks to the value of having employees work in teams. When there are two or more employees assigned to tasks, they oversee each other’s actions and can correct mistakes as soon as they occur. Additionally, more than one employee on a task means a faster response when emergencies happen.

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About the Author

Lindsay Kramer has been a full-time writer since 2014. In that time, she's experienced the ups, downs and crazy twists life tends to take when you're launching, building and leading a small business. As a small business owner, her favorite aspect about writing in this field is helping other small business owners and aspiring entrepreneurs become more fluent in the terminology and concepts they face in this role. Previously, she's written on entrepreneurship for 99designs and covered business law topics for law firms.

Photo Credits

  • construction worker image by Greg Pickens from Fotolia.com