Booth Ideas for a Fair

by Lisa McQuerrey; Updated September 26, 2017

A fair booth should reflect the brand image of the exhibitor and effectively display the products or services being showcased. The booth design should draw in visitors through creative signage, eye-catching decorative elements and friendly, welcoming booth staff.

Attract Attention

Set yourself apart with attention-grabbing displays that incorporate color and movement. For example, a live demonstration of your product or service can create buzz and draw an audience, as can a booth worker handing out free goodies. Large and bright signs or props catch eyes above the crowd. An electronic waving clown can draw children into a face-painting booth, and an extra-large wind-catching pinwheel can attract attention for a snow cone booth. Balloons, banners and background music can also grab attention, generate interest and increase traffic. Don't be afraid to use a gimmick to draw in visitors. For example, hold a raffle or let attendees spin a prize wheel.

Tips

  • If you have a recognizable sign, logo or colors you use in your branding efforts, incorporate them into your booth design so customers are attracted to a familiar brand.

Make Your Booth a Haven

Fairs can be tiring for visitors, so create an inviting booth that gives them respite from the heat or cold and provides a place to sit and relax. A fan or a mini heater can be a hard-to-resist attraction in inclement weather. Offer complimentary beverages or snacks -- fresh cookies and rich coffees have distinctive smells that are hard to resist. Have brochures, catalogs or portfolios of work for visitors to browse while they're resting.

Food Vendors

If you’re selling food or drinks, have a “taste tester” hand out samples to the crowd to generate interest. If the fare you make is interesting to watch, put the cooking process front-and-center so it becomes an attraction. For example, a giant cotton candy machine or curly fry potato slicer are fun to watch in operation.

Tips

  • Employ enough people to handle anticipated crowds so customers aren’t subject to long wait times.

Use Your Staff to Your Advantage

Train your booth workers to be outgoing, friendly and engaging. They should stand ready to invite people into your booth, promote specials and answer questions. All booth staff should be dressed alike -- bright colors can attract attention -- and be professional at all times. Warn staffers away from grouping together in the back of the booth or sitting and talking with each other rather than working to draw traffic your way.

Ease of Traffic

Your booth design should encourage attendees to walk in and explore while still providing them with enough elbow room that no one bumps into each other or damages your merchandise. For example, an L-shaped design allows people walking by to see your goods from two directions while entering and exiting from a less-crowded area. Such a setup also lets you position yourself in the booth’s corner and easily address customers inside and outside the display, all while keeping an eye on merchandise.

About the Author

Lisa McQuerrey has been a business writer since 1987. In 1994, she launched a full-service marketing and communications firm. McQuerrey's work has garnered awards from the U.S. Small Business Administration, the International Association of Business Communicators and the Associated Press. She is also the author of several nonfiction trade publications, and, in 2012, had her first young-adult novel published by Glass Page Books.