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Resume Objectives for a Police Officer

by Trisha Bartle ; Updated September 26, 2017
Man Hunt On For Former LAPD Officer Suspected Of Shooting Police Officer

Even though the position is often stressful and may be dangerous, a career as a police officer may appeal to the risk-taker inside. The field is expected to continue to grow between 2012 and 2022, so brush up your resume to add strong objectives related to law enforcement.

Using a Resume Objective

While objectives are common on a resume, they aren't required. Some employers skip over the sentence-long objective when reading a resume because prospective employees often state what they are looking for rather than how they can benefit the employer. If you're set on keeping objectives on your police officer resume, explain what you can offer the employer rather than focusing on your desire.

Focus on Your Skills

When writing the resume objectives, mention the areas in which you have excelled as a police officer or police trainee. If you did well at subduing perpetrators with non-lethal force, state this in the objectives. For example, say, "Working as a police officer for a precinct that appreciates advanced use of non-lethal force." You could also use this opportunity to mention any awards or commendations you have received during your service.

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Target the Position

Tailor your resume objectives to the specific position for which you're applying. Use the job description as a way to describe how you're perfect for the position. For instance, when applying to be a college campus police officer, talk about your experience with handling rowdy college-aged students. If applying for a desk position as a police officer, talk of your efficiency in filling out paperwork or fielding calls from witnesses. For example, you can say, "A desk position at a police station where swift reporting is encouraged or required."

Generic Objectives

At some point, you may want to apply to a police department without seeing a specific job posting. Because you don't know what positions are open, use a generalized resume objective. In this case, state what you're looking for in your ideal position as a police officer while wording it in a way that benefits the employer. If you want eventually to become a detective, you could write, "A position as a police officer that encourages skills in deduction to help detectives in investigations."

About the Author

Trisha Bartle began her writing career in 2007, with work appearing in publications such as "Adventures for the Average Woman" and DexKnows Weddings. She has also been a professional wedding photographer since 2001. Bartle holds an Associate of Applied Science in programming and game development.

Photo Credits

  • Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images News/Getty Images
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