What Is a Profile Title in a Resume?

by Mary Jane; Updated September 26, 2017

A resume profile title informs the employer about who you are as a professional and what professional title you have worked towards achieving. An effective resume title must identify your target job position and a qualification that shows you are the ideal choice for the position, reports the Monster Career Advice website. This is your chance to make your application stand out from other applicants.

Resume Title Formatting

The profile title is formatted as a brief sentence. The title is a professional name or title, followed by a desired job target and the number of years of experience in the specific field, according to Monster Career Advice. For instance, the job title is "Customer Service Representative" with manager experience as a requirement. For example, you could indicate on your resume: "Customer service representative with 10 years of working experience."

Title Location

The profile title on your resume is located on the top of each page of your resume. The resume title should be in bold or enlarged so it stands out immediately to the employer. Do not place your title in the middle of your resume, as the employer may not be patient enough to read that far.

Writing the Title

A profile title must include keywords specific to the job for which you are applying. Employers often spend only a few seconds analyzing and browsing through the resumes, and having those key words can get the employer to notice your resume and put it in the interview pile. If an employer is looking for a customer service representative for a technical department, the resume title must include the keywords “customer,” “technical” and “service” rather than simply “administrative representative” even if you have experience in other administrative fields or departments.

Company vs. Your Skills

When you are writing your profile title for your resume, focus on what the company is looking for rather than what you find is the most professional. For example, you may find that your previous experience makes you stand out, but if the employer does not benefit from your previous experience, you should not include it. In other words, it is about the company’s needs, not your own preferences.

About the Author

Based in Toronto, Mary Jane has been writing for online magazines and databases since 2002. Her articles have appeared on the Simon & Schuster website and she received an editor's choice award in 2009. She holds a Master of Arts in psychology of language use from the University of Copenhagen in Denmark.