How to Write a Marketing Specification

by Audrey Farley; Updated September 26, 2017
Businessman having a presentation in conference room

A marketing specifications sheet, sometimes referred to as a "marketing requirements document" or a "spec sheet," is a document that specifies the details of a product or scheme for which there is a market. Typically, a product manager or other business professional writes marketing specifications sheets on behalf of customers or clients. He then submits them to product designers or architects. A marketing specifications sheet should include certain essential components.

Step 1

Begin the marketing specifications sheet with an introduction or overview to identify for the reader the main ideas or specifications to be discussed throughout the document. Thematically outline the specifications to give the reader an idea of what to expect. For instance, if writing a marketing specifications sheet for a software program, indicate that the customers specify a more user-friendly program, but avoid going into specific details in the introduction.

Step 2

Provide detail for each specification, avoiding being overly broad or vague. Clearly explain the requirement and provide an example, if possible, to assist the reader in understanding what, precisely, the market specifies. Give enough detail to provide context, but avoid giving so much detail that the reader is overwhelmed or confused.

Step 3

Include only realistic specifications. Collaborate with a product management team, if necessary, to determine which specifications can be achieved. For specifications that may be difficult to attain, provide instruction for satisfying specifications. Identify resources that may assist the product development to address specifications.

Step 4

Specify time constraints, if applicable. For instance, indicate whether a specification only applies until a certain condition is met. Also indicate the deadline by which the product development is expected to respond to specifications.

Step 5

Use technical terminology, because professionals, such as a product development team or product designers or architects, will read the specifications sheet. Translate the marketing specifications that you gather from customer research to technical terms that the product makers and managers will understand.

About the Author

Audrey Farley began writing professionally in 2007. She has been featured in various issues of "The Mountain Echo" and "The Messenger." Farley has a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of Richmond and a Master of Arts in English literature from Virginia Commonwealth University. She teaches English composition at a community college.

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