How to Write a Project Statement

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Writing a project statement is essential to getting a venture off the ground. Project – or scope – statements outline essential information necessary to make important decisions throughout the endeavor. Project statements are handed out to project team members and clients to put everyone on the same page with relation to goals, timelines and costs. According to Microsoft, along with the developer and client names and titles, project statements must include four specific pieces of data: project validity, objectives, product and deliverables.

Begin with a statement of validity – or justification. Include quantitative and qualitative data on how the project will exploit a need in the open market. Specify how the project will meet the needs of the client. Note technical aspects of the project and any legal issues the team and client must consider.

Write out all necessary objectives of the project. Identify specific project costs and timelines. Specify every goal of the project and overview all of the labor associated with successfully meeting the objectives.

Point out the main product of the project. Map out the development of the product. Mark any hurdles you anticipate in its creation and how to overcome the hurdles. Identify any supplemental work required to complete the project – additional research, for instance – and how the project may benefit via interfaces with additional ventures.

Identify deliverables. Write out what the project – and product – will achieve. Be specific and detail every single benefit that will serve the client and open market at large.

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About the Author

Jeffery Keilholtz began writing in 2002. He has worked professionally in the humanities and social sciences and is an expert in dramatic arts and professional politics. Keilholtz is published in publications such as Raw Story and Z-Magazine, and also pens political commentary under a pseudonym, Maryann Mann. He holds a dual Associate of Arts in psychology and sociology from Frederick Community College.

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