How to Run a Banquet Hall

by Mary Corbin; Updated September 26, 2017
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A banquet hall caters to different occasions, including anniversaries, retirement parties, birthdays, corporate events and weddings. Generally, people book reservations months in advance, making the task of running a banquet hall potentially challenging. Running a successful banquet business requires much organization. You must be able to consult with guests, coordinate events with your staff and manage the daily administrative duties needed to keep the doors open.

Step 1

Tour banquet halls in your location. Look at their amenities, facilities and rental packages. Study their marketing strategies so you can effectively run your business against the local competition.

Step 2

Stick to a budget. Run your banquet hall efficiently by committing to a monthly budget for expenses. Plan appropriately for taxes, utilities, mortgages, insurance, advertising, maintenance costs and so on. Prepare for unseen costs that may occur such as maintenance issues with plumbing or electrical.

Step 3

Keep up to date on all require business licenses for your banquet hall. Each state has required permits for businesses related to occupancy, liquor and food. Contact your secretary of state's office for applications. In most cases, an inspection of your banquet hall is required by the state board of health.

Step 4

Hire managers and staff to work in your banquet hall. Hire an experienced restaurant or banquet supervisor to keep the servers and kitchen organized while you tend to other matters. Train your managers and staff to handle large events and unexpected problems by running a series of practice services with them.

Step 5

Hire event/wedding planners to help coordinate special events. These professionals can manage specific details such as seating arrangements and color schemes for weddings and large parties.

Step 6

Maintain an inventory of glasses, china, flatware and linens for events. Find vendors from which you can rent some event supplies, including dining tables and chairs. Renting equipment saves money and time for a busy banquet hall. Consider working with a catering service for large corporate events.

Warnings

  • Prepare your staff for routine or unexpected inspections from your state's health department. The banquet hall's kitchen, bathrooms and fire alarms may be checked routinely without notice.

About the Author

Mary Corbin began her career writing for online and print media in Indianapolis. Since 2004, she has covered subjects such as home and family, technology and legal issues. Working in the broadcast industry, Corbin created articles for marketing, public relations and business matters. She graduated with a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Indiana University.

Photo Credits

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