How to Write a Reinstatement Letter

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If you left a job in good standing and are interested in returning to that company, you can present your request in a formal reinstatement letter. The purpose of this letter is to inform the company of your desire to return to work for them and remind them of your skills and expertise. While the reinstatement process will depend on a number of factors, such as your standing within the company and whether or not they have any open positions, the reinstatement letter is the first step in getting the process started.

Introduce Your Situation

The information you include in your reinstatement letter will depend on why you left your role. A sample letter asking for a job back after being fired or let go will differ from one if you left on your own accord for another position. Be sure to address your letter to a decision-maker in the company, such as your previous manager or a human resources manager.

Begin by introducing yourself and your relation to the company. Even if the person you are writing to knows that you were employed there before, it’s beneficial to remind them of the specifics. For example, “As you know, I was employed at Good Foods Inc from 2001 to 2018 in the packaging department. I left in 2018 as my family was moving out of state.” Next, tell the reader the purpose of your letter. For example, “We have recently returned to the area and I am writing with the hopes of attaining my previous role at Good Foods.”

If you have fond memories of the company, you can mention them in your letter. This shows the reader your desire to be a part of the team once again: “I truly valued my time at Good Foods and hold the company and management in high regard.”

Remind Your Employer of Your Value

When asking for your job back, it’s vital to remind your employer of why they hired you in the first place. What do you bring to the organization that makes you valuable to them? Be sure to mention specific projects you worked on or quantitative results you helped the company achieve.

For example, “As the sales manager at Fun Parties, I consistently ensured my team met all of their sales targets each year. In 2015, we set the record for highest sales ever achieved at the company. My experience leading teams and establishing sales strategies was instrumental to the organization’s success.”

Also tell the company what you have learned since you have been away. Mention any new skills or qualifications you have achieved. For example, “Over the last year, I took a course on operations management and have gained new skills in creating efficient workplace procedures.”

Ask for Other Options

Keep in mind that your former position may be unavailable. It may be taken by another employee or it may no longer be required at the company. If this is the case, you can request an alternative position that will utilize your skills and experience. This may require some research on your part to figure out whether the role is still available.

Outline what you hope to achieve if your old position is already taken. For example, “While I understand that the Customer Service Manager position is not available any longer, I am interested in returning to any position within the company that is customer facing. I truly enjoy working with customers and excel at sales, conflict resolution and relationship building.”

End Your Reinstatement Letter with a Call to Action

Request a follow-up meeting or a phone call so you can further discuss the matter with a decision-maker at the company. For example, “I appreciate you taking the time to read this letter, and I would love to meet with you in person to learn more about how I can rejoin the organization.”

References

About the Author

Anam Ahmed is a Toronto-based writer and editor with over a decade of experience helping small businesses and entrepreneurs reach new heights. She has experience ghostwriting and editing business books, especially those in the "For Dummies" series, in addition to writing and editing web content for the brand. Anam works as a marketing strategist and copywriter, collaborating with everyone from Fortune 500 companies to start-ups, lifestyle bloggers to professional athletes. As a small business owner herself, she is well-versed in what it takes to run and market a small business. Anam earned an M.A. from the University of Toronto and a B.A.H. from Queen's University. Learn more at www.anamahmed.ca.

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